Set to splurge on a new dual-cab ute? Choosing between the new Toyota HiLux, Mazda BT-50, Isuzu D-Max and Great Wall Cannon

Australia’s new-ute tsunami continues to wash across the country, with the new Toyota HiLux, Isuzu D-Max and Mazda BT-50 having now officially landed Down Under, and with the Great Wall Cannon still set for a Q4 2020 launch.

Short answer? It means dual-cab shoppers have never been so spoiled for choice, nor has it ever been harder to know you’re making the right decision with your hard-earned dollars. To take some of the stress out of the decision, we’ve highlighted the key points you need to know about each new ute – that way you know whether to drop the bundle now, or wait for the new Ford Ranger, Nissan Navara and Mitsubishi Triton to show their hands, too.

Read on for our cheat-sheet to the new dual-cab metal on offer in Oz.

New Toyota HiLux

What’s new?

  • More power
  • More technology
  • Tougher, Australian-made design

The best-selling vehicle in Australia has at last been updated, with more power, more tech and more style headlining the changes for the Japanese giant’s workhorse.

The bad news? You’ll be paying for it. On sale from August 27, the new HiLux line-up now starts from $23,590 – $1715 more than its predecessor.

The line-up still consists of the Workmate, SR and SR5 grades, but you can also opt for the new SR+ and SR5+ grades, with Rogue and Rugged X models to follow, too.

That’s a lot of models to chew over, so let’s get back to basics for a moment.

Reports of a significant power boost have been confirmed, with the HiLux’s 2.8-litre diesel engine now good for a maxmium 150kW and 500Nm, putting it on par with the best from Ford – the 157kW and 500Nm Ranger Raptor.

For comparison, the Mitsubishi Triton produces 133kW and 430Nm, the Nissan Navara is good for 140kW and 450Nm, and the VW Amarok produces 190kW and 580Nm.

There has also been key suspension upgrades, with new bushings, a new leaf-spring design, and revised shock tuning, designed to “provide a more comfortable ride, particularly over rough roads and with low loads while maintaining HiLux’s legendary off-road capabilities”. Towing capacity is now 3500kg on all 4X4 models, while on 4×2 variants, diesel automatics are now rated at 2800kg.

The HiLux has also received a welcome tech boost, with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto now included for the first time. The true smartphone mirroring technology fills a significant gap in the HiLux’s usability, and means drivers can access phone calls, text messages, podcasts and playlists from behind the wheel. An 8.0-inch screen is now standard, along with a 4.2-inch multi-information display in the driver’s binnacle.

There is also revised suspension geometry also coming that, in the words of Toyota, will “maintain its reputation for world-class quality, durability and reliability”.

As usual, there are A LOT of prices to get through, so here’s what you’ll be paying:

2021 Toyota HiLux pricing before on-road costs

Variant

Transmission

Cost

4×2 Workmate single-cab chassis

manual

$23,590 (+$1715)

4×2 Workmate single-cab chassis

automatic

$25,590 (+$1715)

4×2 Workmate dual-cab pick-up

manual

$33,070 (+$1445)

4×2 Workmate dual-cab pick-up

automatic

$35,070 (+$1445)

4×2 Workmate Hi-Rider single-cab chassis

manual

$27,390 (+$1440)

4×2 Workmate Hi-Rider dual-cab pick-up

manual

$40,160 (+$1795)

4×2 Workmate Hi-Rider dual-cab pick-up

automatic

$42,160 (+$1795)

4×2 SR Hi-Rider extra-cab pick-up

automatic

$44,210 (+$2345)

4×2 SR Hi-Rider double-cab pick-up

manual

$43,230 (+$2365)

4×2 SR Hi-Rider double-cab pick-up

automatic

$45,230 (+$2365)

4×2 SR5 Hi-Rider double-cab pick-up

manual

$53,690 (+$2950)

4×4 Workmate single-cab chassis

manual

$39,520 (+$1655)

4×4 Workmate extra-cab chassis

automatic

$45,220 (+$1855)

4×4 Workmate double-cab chassis

automatic

$47,290 (+$1915)

4×4 Workmate double-cab pick-up

manual

$46,790 (+$1915)

4×4 Workmate double-cab pick-up

automatic

$48,790 (+$1915)

4×4 SR single-cab chassis

manual

$42,590 (+$2305)

4×4 SR single-cab chassis

automatic

$44,590 (+$2305)

4×4 SR extra-cab chassis

manual

$46,250 (+$2385)

4×4 SR extra-cab chassis

automatic

$48,250 (+$2385)

4×4 SR dual-cab chassis

manual

$48,510 (+$2495)

4×4 SR dual-cab chassis

automatic

$50,660 (+$2655)

4×4 SR dual-cab pick-up

manual

$50,010 (+$2495)

4×4 SR dual-cab pick-up

automatic

$52,160 (+$2645)

4×4 SR+ dual-cab pick-up

manual

$52,010 (NEW)

4×4 SR+ dual-cab pick-up

automatic

$54,160 (NEW)

4×4 SR5 dual-cab chassis

automatic

$58,420 (NEW)

4×4 SR5 extra-cab pick-up

automatic

$58,400 (+$3160)

4×4 SR5 dual-cab pick-up

manual

$57,920 (+$2680)

4×4 SR5 dual-cab pick-up

automatic

$59,920 (+$2680)

4×4 SR5+ dual-cab chassis

automatic

$60,920 (NEW)

4×4 SR5+ dual-cab pick-up

manual

$60,420 (NEW)

4×4 SR5+ dual-cab pick-up

automatic

$62,420 (NEW)

 

Mazda BT-50 – 2020

What’s new?

  • Isuzu twin under the skin
  • All-new Mazda design
  • Punchy 3.0-litre turbo-diesel

Mazda deserve serious plaudits from keeping the world’s prying eyes away from the BT-50 until it was good and ready to show it off. Happily, the brand has finally revealed the vehicle in full, told us what to expect, and confirmed an October on-sale date in Australia.

We know already, of course, that the new BT-50 is a D-Max twin, with fellow Japanese company Isuzu taking the lead on developing and manufacturing the new workhorse.

That means Mazda takes Isuzu’s lauded 3.0-litre turbo-diesel four-cylinder engine, good for 140kW/450Nm, and the brand’s six-speed automatic transmission, with a manual also expected to be offered. Downside? it actually means a power downgrade of 7kW and 20Nm compared to the most powerful version of the outgoing model. The new car will carry 1000kg, and tow 3.5 tonne, though.

Mazda is clearly targeting a semi-upmarket space with the BT-50, and that means Mazda’s Kodo design theme, including a front-end seemingly borrowed from the brand’s SUV line-up.

Inside, you get a big touchscreen, standard nav, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and, on the more expensive models, leather-wrapped seats and fine interior materials.

Standard safety in the BT-50 will include AEB, lane departure warning, blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert, with the brand known to be targeting a five-star ANCAP safety rating.

Pricing is yet to be confirmed.

 

Isuzu D-Max

What’s new?

  • More powerful diesel donk
  • Better cabin tech
  • Plenty of capability

It’s been a long time coming, but a new Isuzu D-Max has at last arrived in Australia, and is now just days away from its September 1 on-sale date. But like with the Toyota, there’s some tough news to swallow first – the D-Max price has jumped by at least $1900, and as much as $6100, depending on the model.

We’ll detail the pricing in a table in a moment, but in the meantime, let’s look at what you get for the money.

Available in four grades and three body-styles, and you’ll get a tickled version of the brand’s 3.0-litre turbo-diesel four-cylinder engine, now putting our 140kW and 450Nm. You’ll also carry at least 970kg and tow 3.5-tonne.

You also get an impressive six-year/150,000-kilometre warranty, with seven years/105,000km capped price servicing on offer, too.

There’s also updated suspension, faster steering, bigger brake rotors and a wading depth increase to 800mm complete a fairly comprehensive mechanical update.

A change to the four-wheel-drive architecture sees a new aluminium propeller shaft to lower overall weight, and all 4WD models are fitted with a rear differential lock. The changes, says Isuzu, means a shorter transfer time between two- and four-wheel drive, as well as between low and high range.

At a minimum, all versions of the D-Max are fitted with air-conditioning, power windows, 17-inch steel wheels, automatic wipers, cloth interior, power-adjustable door mirrors, tilt and telescoping multi-function steering wheel, a matte grey front grille and a 4.2-inch customisable driver display as well as a 7.0-inch multimedia screen with wireless Apple CarPlay and wired Android Auto, a four-speaker sound system and voice commands.

Likewise, the minimum safety list includes eight airbags, trailer sway control and Isuzu’s Intelligent Driver Assistant System (IDAS), which includes autonomous emergency braking (AEB) with pedestrian and cyclist detection, forward collision warning, traffic sign recognition, lane departure warning, lane-keep assist, driver attention alert, blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert, high-beam assist and a reversing camera.

Suffice it to say, though, the more you spend, the more you get.

 

2021 Isuzu D-Max 4×2 pricing before on-road costs

 

Variant

Transmission

Cost

Single Cab Chassis SX

Manual

$32,200 (+$3600)

Single Cab Chassis SX

Automatic

$34,200 (+$2300)

Crew Cab Chassix SX

Automatic

$40,700 (+$3200)

Space Cab Ute SX

Automatic

$38,900 (+$2600)

Crew Cab Ute SX

Automatic

$41,900 (+$3200)

Crew Cab Ute LS-U

Automatic

$48,900 (+$4800)

2021 Isuzu D-Max 4×4 pricing before on-road costs

 

Variant

Transmission

Cost

Single Cab Chassis SX

Manual

$40,200 (+$2000)

Single Cab Chassix SX

Automatic

$42,200 (+$1900)

Space Cab Chassis SX

Manual

$43,700 (+$2700)

Space Cab Chassis SX

Automatic

$45,700 (+$2600)

Crew Cab Chassix SX

Manual

$46,700 (+$3300)

Crew Cab Chassix SX

Automatic

$48,700 (+$3200)

Crew Cab Ute SX

Manual

$47,900 (+$3300)

Crew Cab Ute SX

Automatic

$49,900 (+$3200)

Crew Cab Ute LS-M

Manual

$51,000 (+$4100)

Crew Cab Ute LS-M

Automatic

$53,000 (+$4000)

Space Cab Ute LS-U

Automatic

$53,900 (+$5200

Crew Cab Ute LS-U

Manual

$54,900 (+$6100)

Crew Cab Ute LS-U

Automatic

$56,900 (+$6000)

Crew Cab Ute X-Terrain

Automatic

$62,900 (New)

 

Great Wall Cannon – Q4 2020

What’s new?

  • Punchy 2.0-litre engine
  • “Australian-focused ride and handling”
  • All-new design

The Great Wall Cannon is about the only new ute we’re still waiting on the full skinny for. And there’s a lot to know, because everything is new.

The good news is the ute has already launched overseas, so we have a solid idea of just what to expect when the new ute touches down in Australia in Q4 this year.

We don’t know yet just how much it will cost, but we do know the brand is targeting a sharp price point, with the one representative telling us “It will make a lot of people think ‘why am I paying this amount of money for a ute, when someone like Great Wall can build something to this level of comfort and capability?’.”

It will also be powered by a punchy 2.0-litre turbo-diesel engine. In international markets, it makes some 120kW and 400Nm, though we understand the Australian operation is targeting a higher 450Nm torquer figure. That engine pairs with a eight-speed ZF automatic or a six-seed manual, with power sent to two or four tyres.

The Cannon measures 5410mm in length, 1934mm in width and 1886mm in height, and with a tray that stretches 1520mm/1520mm. Great Wall says to expect a 1000kg payload and a “minimum” 3000kg braked towing capacity, which is precisely what the local arm has asked its Chinese HQ to deliver.

While the Cannon won’t have an Australian-specific suspension tune, we’re told that feedback from our market was instrumental to the global suspension tune the Cannon will ultimately get, so we’ll have to wait and see.

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August 26, 2020 2:31 pm Published by